Eminent Australasian corrosion practitioners and researchers who have delivered the lecture include Greig Wallwork (in 1983), Graham Wright (in 1984), Graeme Kelly (in 1986), Brian Cherry (in 1987), Ian MacLeod (in 1988), John Duncan (in 1990), Les Boulton (in 1993), David Nicholas (in 1994), Peter Farinha (in 1995), Paul Schweinsberg (in 1997), Tony Betts (in 2000), Brian Martin (in 2001), Bruce Ackland (in 2005), Rob Melchers (in 2009) and Graham Sussex (in 2012). It is not by coincidence that many of these eminent PFT Lecturers have also been past ACA Presidents, Operations Committee Members, Branch Presidents, Corrosion & Materials Journal Editors and Associate Editors, Conference Paper Reviewers, etc. This is a clear demonstration of their giving something back to the corrosion profession. As a form of appreciation, the ACA have also afforded many of these past PFT Lecturers Life Membership not just for their contributions to the practice of corrosion and the research thereof but also as recognition of their volunteer contributions to the ACA.

The gaps in the table are not because the PFT Lectures were not given, but because in those days hard-copies only of proceedings were produced and there are no copies of the proceedings for the 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977 & 1979 Conferences in the ACA Library.

The 1978 P F Thompson Lecturer is significant. J W Thompson, John (Jack) Thompson, was the eldest son of PFT. Like his father, J W Thompson was also a metallurgist. It was Jack Thompson’s eldest son Graham Thompson (also a metallurgist) that was entrusted with PFT’s files and from which so much more information on PFT has been able to be gleaned.

YearLocationMemorial LecturerTopic of Lecture
2017SydneyMaria ForsythControlling Corrosion with Chemistry
2016AucklandPatricia ShawCorrosion of Polymeric Materials
2015AdelaideRob FrancisWho Rusts First: Revisiting Galvanic Corrosion
2014DarwinWarren GreenElectrochemistry and Its Relevance in Reinforced Concrete Durability, Repair and Protection
2013BrisbaneArthur AustinWhere Theory Meets Practice; Some Demonstrations and Case Histories
2012MelbourneGraham SussexA Journey Through Stainless Steel
2011Perth (ICC)Ian MacLeodConsuming Corrosion –A Journey into the Realm of Materials Conservation
2010AdelaideDennis RichardsThe Good, The Bad and the Ugly of the Heavy Duty Coating Industry
2009Coffs HarbourRob MelchersExperiments, Science and Intuition in the Development of Models for the Corrosion of Steel Infrastructure
2008WellingtonKeith LichtiAccelerated Corrosion Testing
2007SydneyFred SalomeState of Corrosion Address
2006HobartIvan Baxter
2005Gold CoastDr Bruce Ackland
2004PerthRobert de GraafCorrosion Management Australia
2003MelbourneMark Weston
2002AdelaideIan McLeodElectrons Lost in Paradise
2001NewcastleMr Brian MartinStray Current Corrosion Real Corrosion
2000AucklandDr Tony BettsCorrosion Technology from the Industrial Age to the Information Age and Beyond
1999SydneyDr Bruce Hinton
1998HobartProfessor Brian Cherry
1997BrisbaneDr Paul SchweinsbergModern Science, Technology and the Learned Society
1996MelbourneProf Brian Cherry
1995PerthDr Peter FarinhaCorrosion Management in Mining – MIC a Problem
1994AdelaideDr David Nicholas
1993NewcastleLes Boulton
1992HobartGraham RobilliardSynergy in Cause and Prevention
1991SydneyJerry McAuliffe
1990AucklandJohn DuncanMaterials and Maintenance
1989Gold CoastBrian Byrne
1988PerthDr Ian D McLeodLessons from the past, Hope for the future
1987MelbourneProfessor Brian Cherry
1986AdelaideGraeme KellyExperts, Expertise and Expert Systems
1985NewcastleProfessor E O Hall
1984RotoruaGraham A WrightThe Reactivity and Passivity of Metal Surfaces
1983SydneyProfessor G R WallworkCorrosion – Australia versus England
1982HobartJ C ScullyPitting Corrosion
1981BrisbaneProfessor L E Lyons
1980AdelaideProfessor Mattsson
1979PerthAssociate Professor Ian RitchieThe Cancer of Corrosion
1978MelbourneJack W Thompson
1977Newcastle
1976AucklandProfessor A L TitchenerCorrosion – Battle between consumption and conservation
1975Sydney-6th ICMC
1974HobartProfessor H MuirCorrosion and Engineering Design
1973Brisbane
1972AdelaideBrian Casling
1971MelbourneDr Edmund Potter (inaugural lecture)The Corrosion Scene in Australia
1970Newcastle
1969Perth
1968Auckland
1967Brisbane
1966Sydney (Manly)
1964Newcastle
1963Adelaide
1962Auckland
1961Sydney
1960Melbourne

P.F. Thompson Memorial Lecture – Rules and Guidelines

 

Percival Faraday Thompson (1885-1951) is recognized as Australasia’s pioneer in the science and technology of metallic corrosion and its mitigation. In recognition of this singular distinction the Australasian Corrosion Association inaugurated the P.F. Thompson Memorial Lecture in 1971.

The following Rules and Guidelines apply:

  1. The P.F. Thompson Memorial Lecture is the Association’s premier dedicated Lecture and is delivered not more frequently than annually at an Australasian Conference of the Association.
  2. The named dedication of the Lecture cannot he changed or amplified except by resolution of the Association’s governing body supported in writing by a majority of the Association’s Branches.
  3. The P.F. Thompson Memorial Lecturer is selected by the Technical Committee with support and approval by the ACA Board.
  4. The Lecturer is selected for his or her meritorious contributions to the science or technology of materials corrosion and its mitigation, preferably performed at least in part in Australasia.
  5. Being wholly honorific the Lecture carries no monetary award, but the Lecturer is entitled to complimentary registration for the Conference at which the Lecture is delivered and, at the discretion of the Association (and of any specifically appointed sponsors), expenses may be fully or partly refunded to the Lecturer.
  6. The Lecturer may speak on any topics relevant to the Association’s aims and interests, but is encouraged to mark P.F. Thompson’s distinction by referring to or emulating the academic and technical qualities for which Thompson became known, particularly his prowess with practical demonstration. The Lecturer may use assistance during the Lecture, but he or she is uniquely the named Lecturer.

 

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